Archive

Posts Tagged ‘bubble’

2013/11/15: Commentary: QE-Infinity III: The Silence of the Bernanke

November 15, 2013 Leave a comment

QE-Infinity III: The Silence of the Bernanke

Extended review of the immediate QE implications of the Fed Chairman transition

and extended implications for the fully ‘mature’ QE-Infinity program

© 2013 ROHR International, Inc. All International rights reserved.

Commentary: Friday, November 15th Weekend Read

YELLENhearingCSPAN-131114

 

 

QE-Infinity III: The Silence of the Bernanke

We’ve MOVED!!! Come and see the video and a lot more at the NEW Rohr-Blog www.rohr-blog.com

FREE Top Level Trial Subscriptions available with FREE Silver level signup. Simply provide Introduction Reference information at the bottom of the form.

Access to most of the analysis in our politico-economic Commentary also still available with a FREE Silver subscription. Don’t wait!! Get that & your FREE 2-week Platinum Trial NOW!!

Advertisements

2011/08/10: How We Got Here-IV: Welcome to the Island, Survivor (…we hope)

August 10, 2011 5 comments

Yep, it seems to have all turned into a big game of Survivor… And the two-way stretch from the stress factors is obvious. Getting through this is going to be a test of who can stand the huge amount of cognitive dissonance imposed from the outside. That includes the increasingly tedious and blindingly benighted machinations of the political class and alleged financial luminaries, and the radical, rabid dog reactions it foments in the markets.

It increasingly seems this is going to be a test of endurance, as Ben Bernanke was probably right to indicate that there won’t be much need to raise rates between now and mid-2013. In other words, after his previous soothing views on the economy and markets, the Fed head has thrown in the towel on expecting anything truly positive to develop in the intermediate term. And that’s not just us playing off his perceptions, as we have been great skeptics of the ability to return to an upbeat economic environment in spite of any improvement in equities and risk assets. And neither is it plain old bearish talk. Beyond the fiscal and debt ceiling dilemmas, there is good reason to believe it can’t get better this side of the next US general election.

Read more…